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Author Topic: 220 Engine Rebuild  (Read 514 times)

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Offline Henry Magno

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  • Location: USA, Massachusetts
  • Year_Model: 1952 220 Cab B, 1937 320 Sedan, 1937 320 Combination Coupe, 1938 320 Cab A LWB
Re: 220 Engine Rebuild
« Reply #40 on: July 28, 2017, 10:49:09 AM »
Are there professional MB judges? There are some dedicated club members like Peter Lesler, Concours Committee Chairman, who are quite knowledgeable about about a broad range of cars, but it is impossible to know all models.

Yes that later ignition tubes were plated. The coil was black.  The blue 6 volt high output coil I think is the only Bosch coil available and it is fine. If you use that one you can always paint it black.

These detailing specifications changed over time, but assumptions are made that what they did in 1958 had to be the same in 1952. One of my pet peeves is the use of zinc chromate on earlier cars. I've asked a lot of questions of other experienced people about when the chromate or gold finish started to be used. A reliable source recently suggested that it wasn't until the sixties and I may be inclined to believe him. I see a lot of it on fifties restorations and I keep looking for evidence of it on original parts. I recently had a part in hand that had a yellowish tone to it, but one part of it was covered by something. The covered part clearly not yellow at all. So the exposure to the elements had changed the color.

Another issue is replacement parts. If MB provided a replacement part later on, they may have used any finish in practice at the time. The part may be old and look original, but if it were made after some time in the sixties you can't be sure of the finish. I'm installing new engine side covers at the moment, and the are coated black on the inside and zinc chromate outside. This is an easy one. The were painted on the early 220's and I'm sure painted into the ponton period. Did they stop painting these by the time they were phased out, I don't know.

Offline Scott Montoney

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  • 1952 - 220 Cab B
  • Exterior Color: Black
  • Interior color: Red
  • Location: Mason,Ohio USA
  • VIN #: 187.013.04370/52
  • Year_Model: '52 220 Cab B
Re: 220 Engine Rebuild
« Reply #41 on: July 28, 2017, 12:03:10 PM »
Thanks!
Yes, I couldn't think of an accurate descriptive word at the time so I used "professional".

Since my engine was replaced in 1963, I is possible that the replacement engine did have the plated tube.

I really do enjoy learning some of the history.
Thanks for taking the time to educate us.
« Last Edit: July 28, 2017, 12:22:24 PM by Scott Montoney »
"Gertrude" a.k.a. "Troidl"
1952 - 220 Cabriolet B

Offline Scott Montoney

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  • Trade Count: (0)
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  • Posts: 560
  • 1952 - 220 Cab B
  • Exterior Color: Black
  • Interior color: Red
  • Location: Mason,Ohio USA
  • VIN #: 187.013.04370/52
  • Year_Model: '52 220 Cab B
Re: 220 Engine Rebuild
« Reply #42 on: August 09, 2017, 07:26:02 AM »
The shop manual says the springs for the newer aluminum head can also be used for the older cast iron head, but not the other way around. 

UPDATE:
Earlier in this topic, I commented about the different valve springs and making sure the correct ones are used.  Well, if new ones are ordered, regardless of the original part number, they both link to a new number.  I expected these new springs to match the specs of the updated springs in the specifications hand book.  They do not.  The wire gauge is slightly thinner, but the length of the coil is a little longer.  So, I'm no longer concerned that the wrong spring were installed.  I have to assume that the new specs are compatible in performance. It's the only set of springs available for the car anyway.
"Gertrude" a.k.a. "Troidl"
1952 - 220 Cabriolet B