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Author Topic: Sand / Soda / sanding  (Read 2024 times)

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Offline Stoebel

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Sand / Soda / sanding
« on: December 17, 2012, 09:04:55 AM »
Hello guys,

I used the search option in this forum and I found three topics dealing with this subject.They were informative but don't answer all my questions.

I'd like to know the following:
- which parts of your car did you sandblast or sodablast? Which parts did you sand by hand?
- if you had it done by someone else what did it cost.

I'm thinking about having the frame sodablasted (this is more expensive but less hard for the metal I think)...

Thanks!


ps: does anyone have a log with the steps he or she used to remove the body? (I have the instructions manual but info of someone who has done it is much more interesting).
« Last Edit: December 17, 2012, 09:14:26 AM by Stoebel »

Offline Henry Magno

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Re: Sand / Soda / sanding
« Reply #1 on: December 17, 2012, 11:23:47 AM »
The painted parts of the body, what you see, should be soda or media blasted to remove the paint, any rusty parts will need a more aggressive media like sand, aluminum oxide etc. The floor and underside of the body probably will need "sand" as will the frame. You won't damage the frame by sandblasting.

Offline Stoebel

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Re: Sand / Soda / sanding
« Reply #2 on: December 19, 2012, 08:59:51 AM »
Ok thank you for the info Henry.

« Last Edit: December 19, 2012, 09:02:15 AM by Stoebel »

Offline roadster36

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Re: Sand / Soda / sanding
« Reply #3 on: May 30, 2013, 12:02:14 PM »
And what do you think of paintremover

Offline Ron B

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Re: Sand / Soda / sanding
« Reply #4 on: May 31, 2013, 06:45:44 AM »
my experience of soda blasting has been negative. it works well, and the mess isn't too bad but the after effects are pretty unique.
 One example is burnt into my brain..
I rebuilt an engine for a W112 300SE coupe which had been soda blasted . unfortunately the soda guy told the owner he could leave the wiring loom in place. By the time the car was being reassembled i was asked to connect the wiring and get all the electrics working. Simple enough on a W112 with no pitfalls...  ::)
Sure.. i had everything connected but nothing worked. because there was no upholstery or windshield installed at this point it was reasonably easy to reach everything. So I checked the fuse and one of the brass contracts fell out intro my hand ...
I looked closer and noticed all were bright green with verdigris .
I replaced the fusebox and somethings were working, but others like the wiper motor were dead as door knob.
i checked the column combination switch and it was full of white soda,as was the entire bundle of cables into the column .Right inside the plastic sheathing in fact. :(
I cleaned all the plugs on the car,a job which took 11 hours.
 At this time the weather was very humid.
 The next day the owner informs me nothing is working .
he employed a auto electrician to come and check and he noticed that there seemed to white powder coming out of the plugs when they were tapped.
he cleaned everything he could see and got everything working.
 A couple of days later,same thing. Nothing was working again.
 At this point i realised that the bicarb was sitting there ,doing nothing but it was every where through the loom.  Add an electrical current though and a chemical reaction occurs . Add a very humid atmosphere and moisture is added to the mix and a  film forms on the copper . This film,as I saw oin the fuse holders eats the copper,a very tough substance not normally prone to chemical attack.
 I'm nmoty a chemist and i have no idea of what this reaction would be called but it happened and is still happening on this car because the owner,after spending close on $80,000 is not keen on spending a further $6000 for a new loom.
Another side effect has been the generator burning out ($$$$) and a couple of regulators frying up.
The other thing is the soda residue which is on steel after it has been blasted. It must be washed off with a vinegar type wash to nuetralise the BiCarb ,then the steel treated with phosphoric wash.
If you dont, bubbles will appear under the paint as the residue begins to eat the steel. I have seen this happen tragically on some very expensive paint jobs too.
To summarize, soda blasting is just one part of the process, the follow up work must be done to ensure that finished job turns out as good as you want it too.

 

Offline Stoebel

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Re: Sand / Soda / sanding
« Reply #5 on: May 31, 2013, 07:24:07 AM »
I sure wouldn't want to be in such a situation...  When looking for a professional I always ask some questions to see if he knows his job. I read something on the internet (for example on this forum) and then I ask him what he thinks about the statement.  Based on the answers he gives I than decide to work with him or not.

Offline roadster36

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Re: Sand / Soda / sanding
« Reply #6 on: May 31, 2013, 10:15:16 AM »
Iam Think paintremover will do the job on my car.
Some one negative experiance with that stuff?

Offline Ron B

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Re: Sand / Soda / sanding
« Reply #7 on: June 02, 2013, 08:36:50 AM »
The best stuff is made with methyl Chloride as an ingredient ,but it stinks!!. when using this stuff wear a rubber apron,gloves and face mask . Use plenty of barrier cream on your hands before donning the glovesd because the stink will go sdtraight through the gloves.
I buy it in 5 liter cans which must be kept in a cool place because of the fumes it gives off.
If the parts you want to strip are off the car,lay them out on sheets of polyplastic .
Spread the stipper on thickly with a spatular ,then wrap the plastic over the parts to keep the fumes in and hwelp the stripper work more effectively.
 

Offline John Ellis

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Re: Sand / Soda / sanding
« Reply #8 on: June 02, 2013, 02:36:49 PM »
If you are doing just small portions of paint removal, I find that mechanical methods work just as fast.  I use a combination of scrapers, wire wheels, and 3M sanding sponge pads (80 grit). 
John Ellis
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Offline Scott Montoney

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Re: Sand / Soda / sanding
« Reply #9 on: June 02, 2013, 07:11:27 PM »
I just happened to see an entry on "FaceBook" made by the Mercedes-Benz Classic Center USA.  They show a picture of a 300 SL Coupe body and it says "on its way to get the paint stripped".  So, I guess if they do it to a 300 SL, it can't be too bad.  But then that all depends on the competence of the person doing it and especially the complete removal of all traces of the stripper from every little place before painting.
"Gertrude" a.k.a. "Troidl"
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Offline Henry Magno

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Re: Sand / Soda / sanding
« Reply #10 on: June 04, 2013, 11:15:05 AM »
Just because they say "stripped" doesn't mean they are using paint remover.  As has been said, the skill of the operator is everything. Plastic media will not remove rust so if outer panels are rusty, some "sand" (aluminum oxide or other) blasting is usually necessary. In certain situations, like a wood framed body that has much of the wood intact, it might be preferable to use paint remover on the body tub, although you can tape off wood and blast around it. It makes for a lot of blowing out the excess media from the nooks and crannies.